The seminar is expected to start at Abu Dhabi UTC+4 from 4:00 pm to 9:00 pm on both days
Day 1: Thursday, February 18th
Day 1: Thursday, February 18th

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  • SESSION CHAIR:
  • Dr. Felix Vega

    Director of Electromagnetic Research, Technology Innovation Institute

4:00 pm – 4:15 pm

Introduction to TII, AMRC and DERC
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Mohammed Al Teneiji

    Chief Researcher, Technology Innovation Institute

  • Dr. Felix Vega

    Director of Electromagnetic Research, Technology Innovation Institute

4:15 pm – 4:45 pm

Applications of nanoantennas and metamaterials: from information processing and imaging to light harvesting for energy conversion
  • Speaker:
  • Prof. Stefan Maier

    Imperial College London

  • Presentation Abstract

    Metallic and dielectric nanostructures provide distinct and unique means for shaping the electromagnetic near field, and for channelling radiation from the far field to the nanoscale. They also form the basis of metamaterials and metasurfaces, which provide fascinating new means of control over light. In my lecture I will give an overview over the application potential of such systems, covering areas such as holography, fiber telecommunications, and light harvesting for energy conversion and photocatalysis. This breadth of applications, based on common physical principles, makes this research area immensely fruitful for interdisciplinary scientific work at the forefront of nanophotonic and energy technologies.

4:45 pm - 5:15 pm

Extraordinarily transparent compact metallic metamaterials
  • Speakers:
  • Dr. Vincenzo Giannini

    Technology Innovation Institute

  • Presentation Abstract

    Metals are highly opaque, yet we show numerically and experimentally that densely packed arrays of metallic nanoparticles can be more transparent to infrared radiation than dielectrics such as germanium, even for arrays that are over 75% metal by volume. Despite strong interactions between the metallic particles, these arrays form effective dielectrics that are virtually dispersion-free, making possible the design of optical components that are achromatic over ultra-broadband ranges of wavelengths from a few microns up to millimeters or more. Furthermore, the local refractive indices may be tuned by altering the size, shape, and spacing of the nanoparticles, allowing the design of gradient-index lenses that guide and focus light on the microscale. The electric field is also strongly concentrated in the gaps between the metallic nanoparticles, and the simultaneous focusing and squeezing of the electric field produces strong ‘doubly-enhanced’ hotspots which could boost measurements made using infrared spectroscopy and other non-linear processes over a broad range of frequencies, with minimal heat production.

5:15 pm - 5:45 pm

Photonic networks metamaterials
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Riccardo Sapienza

    Imperial College London

  • Presentation Abstract

    In this talk I will discuss our recent efforts to control light emission in metamaterials with network architectures, where light flows and get amplified on a random graph, supported by nanostructured sub-wavelength networks [1]. I will discuss how unbalancing the mode competition is an effective strategy for spectral selection of the lasing emission and therefore to single-out a lasing frequency out of the spectral haystack. In particular, I will show how machine learning is specially suited to control the lasing action. I will conclude with some thoughts on how network lasers have potential for neuromorphic signal processing and computing.
    [1] A nanophotonic laser on a graph, M.Gaio, D. Saxena, J. Bertolotti, D. Pisignano, A. Camposeo, R. Sapienza, Nature Comm. 10, 226 (2019)

5:45 pm - 6:15 pm

Electromagnetic Information Theory: Past, Present and Future
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Merouane Debbah

    Centralesupelec, Paris-Saclay University and Lagrange Mathematical and Computing Research Center

  • Presentation Abstract

    In this talk, we will discuss this new avenue of research, with the willingness to unify wireless communication theory and electromagnetic theory, something that has never been achieved since the landmark work of Gabor. In particular, it is known that major advances in Wireless Communications are made by re-questioning the model assumptions and we will discuss how the incorporation of neglected physics has a chance of yielding breakthroughs for next generation wireless communication systems.

6:15 pm - 6:25 pm

BREAK

6:25 pm - 6:55 pm

Application of metasurfaces for the design of multifunctional devices in combination with 2D crystals and Molecular compounds
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Josep Canet-Ferrer

    University of Valencia

  • Presentation Abstract

    From the technological point of view, metasurface research is a hot topic with application in different areas of nano-optics such as perfect light absorbers, diffractive elements or optical modulators. Assembled in compact planar architectures, metasurface based devices has exhibited important advantages in terms of portability and interconnection. However, further penetration of metasurfaces in the industrial sector requires to solve important limitations, specifically, developing fabrication processes to cover large areas, optimizing performance at frequencies of technological interest and improving tuneability. From the fundamental point of view, the control on the electromagnetic field distribution on a metasurface opens and an intriguing scenario to study the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale. Tailoring the density of states or confining electromagnetic field in extremely small volumes metasurfaces boost the coupling of light with a wide range of quasiparticles. In this talk, I will describe how the study of fundamental aspects can be exploited to solve the above mentioned technological issues. In particular, I will show how to enable unexplored reconfiguration strategies from the interplay among excitons, phonons and plasmons with light. Finally, I will give some insights for the application of those strategies in the design of multifunctional devices.

6:55 pm - 7:25 pm

Metamaterials for Integrated Photonics Applications
  • Speaker:
  • Prof. Hugo Hernandez-Figueroa

    UNICAMP

  • Presentation Abstract

    Metamaterial concepts and techniques combined with novel physical materials are having strong impact on the development of electromagnetic oriented areas and inspiring the invention of a multitude of interesting novel applications, particularly in the Microwave, Millimeter-Wave, Terahertz and Optical frequency bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. This talk will be focused on the Integrated Photonics area, which demands strong and robust confinement of light in order to attain the maximum possible integration of photonics devices on a single chip. Keeping this in mind, three applications for optical communications based on LEMAC’s recent developments will be presented in this talk. The first one is related to the bending loss reduction for the TM modes in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based waveguides, by controlling of controlling the momentum of evanescent waves in waveguides using as cladding an engineered anisotropic metamaterial made of multilayers of thin films of germanium and porous silica. TE modes are much less sensitive to bending losses. The second example is focused on the topological optimization design of a non-intuitive SOI photonic antenna. The fabricated device has a footprint of 1.78 μm_x 1.78 μm, and bandwidth broader than 150 nm. Finally, the third example, will discuss a novel compact 3-port circulator consisting of a resonator cavity coupled to 3 single-mode waveguides. The cavity and waveguides are designed over a photonic crystal band-gap triangular lattice made of holes etched in a recent developed magneto-optical material capable to operate without the need of an external DC magnetization.

7:25 pm - 7:55 pm

Multifunctional metasurfaces with absorbing, reflecting and high impedance properties for ICT and Biomedical applications
  • Speaker:
  • Prof. Agostino Monorchio

    University of Pisa

  • Presentation Abstract

    Recently, the increased popularity of multiservice and flexible telecommunication systems fostered the development of Multifunctional Frequency Selective Surfaces (MFSSs) which employs specifically designed FSS, able to perform different behaviour at different bands (reflecting and/or absorbing, and/or polarizing or even high surface impedance or bandgap). By making proper use of active devices, such as PIN diodes and varactor diodes, we are also able to realize electrically controlled Active FSSs due to their features of low cost, high integration level and fast switching speed. In this presentation, the use of MFSSs for obtaining tunable metasurfaces with multifunctional behavior (absorbing and reflecting and so on) will be discussed with particular reference to the bandwidth of such devices. Some solutions will be presented to show their applications to ICT and biomedical devices.

7:55 pm - 8:25 pm

Three Dimensional Photonic Manufacturing of Architectured Metamaterials
  • Speaker:
  • Prof. Nicholas Fang

    MIT

  • Presentation Abstract

    The scientific breakthroughs of data and interconnectivity driven manufacturing may lead to a paradigm shift of design and processing multifunctional elements at unprecedented precision and heterogeneity. These multifunctional elements can be exemplified by the emerging architectured metamaterials with integrated functions that are desirable for a broad array of applications in confined spaces, including impact absorption, thermal management and chemical processing, optical transparency, structural morphing, as well as real time monitoring and repair. An integrated knowledge base is crucial for setting up, steering and analyzing the functionality by combining different geometry and choices of the digital voxels with domain-specific design constraints, together with a library of such accurate designer voxels with predictive analytics that capture essential mechanical and physical properties based on the microstructure. In this talk, I will present our research progress on scalable three dimensional micro/nanofabrication techniques to enable design and exploration of digitally coded multifunctional and multimaterial lightweight metastructures at unprecedented dimensions. The microscale resolution and multi-material capabilities of the 3D printing system and the modeling tools developed can be used to design and fabricate architected materials for combined functions, including energy absorption, actuation/morphing, and micro-scale bioreactors for tissue engineering. I will also discuss the development of engineered, three dimensional arrays of copolymer fibers that serve as mimetics of neuronal axons, using a combination of materials engineering and high resolution 3D microfabrication, which enable study of OPC engagement and subsequent myelination in vitro.

8:25 pm - 8:30 pm

Closing Day 1
  • Speakers:
  • Dr Felix Vega

    Director of Electromagnetic Research, Technology Innovation Institute

Day 2: Friday, February 19th
Day 2: Friday, February 19th

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  • SESSION CHAIR:
  • Dr Vincenzo Giannini

    Lead Researcher, Technology Innovation Institute

4:00 pm - 4:05 pm

Opening Day 2
  • SPEAKERS:
  • Dr Vincenzo Giannini

    Technology Innovation Institute

4:05 pm - 4:15 pm

Phononic, acoustic, and photonic bandgap of architectured metamaterials based on the triply periodic minimal surfaces
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Dong-Wook Lee

    Technology Innovation Institute

  • Presentation Abstract

    Phononic, acoustic, and photonic bandgap of architectured metamaterials based on the triply periodic minimal surfaces

4:15 pm - 4:45 pm

Active and Tunable Metamaterials for HPM Antennas
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Fernando Albarracin

    Technology Innovation Institute

  • Presentation Abstract

    Engineered electromagnetic materials in the RF and Microwave regime offer attractive advantages for both transmitting and receiving radiators. Critical parameters of the radiator, such as impedance matching, radiation pattern, and beam scan angle, can be modified at frequencies at which the sole original geometry cannot support. Additional considerations arise when the design involves wideband or high-power handling capabilities. Tunable responses exploiting the miniaturized cell-size and periodicity characteristics of meta-surfaces in the vicinity of HPM radiators allow new desired system characteristics. Background and new perspectives on tunable metamaterials applied to HPM radiators are explored in this presentation.

4:45 pm - 5:15 pm

Biosensing using Terahertz Metasurfaces
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Ibraheem Al-Naib

    Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University

  • Presentation Abstract

    In the last decade, metasurfaces have attracted great attention from researchers. They can be configured in order to realize devices with quite unique electromagnetic properties. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to designing metasurfaces or planar metamaterials formed by metallic structures on top of dielectric substrates or from dielectrics with certain refractive indices. Devices such as filters, modulators, sensors, and slow light devices can be designed by utilizing metasurfaces. In this presentation, we will talk about our recent activity in the field of biomedical sensing. For example, metasurfaces with quite high quality-factor using conductively coupled split-ring resonators that can be utilized for designing label-free biomedical sensors will be discussed. Moreover, a novel biosensing technique by coating half of a metamaterial unit cell with an unknown thin-film analyte will be presented. Furthermore, the evaluation of an amplitude difference referencing technique to detect analytes with sub-micron thickness at terahertz frequencies will be discussed. Finally, some free-standing metasurfaces will be presented that can be easily fabricated using a laser machining technique. In the future, these designs and ideas could be utilized for the next generation of biomedical sensors in the terahertz frequency range.

5:15 pm - 5:45 pm

Tuning the Spatially Controlled Growth, Structural Self-Organizing and Cluster-Assembling of the Two-Dimensionally Ordered Linear-Chain Carbon Nano-Matrix During Ion-Assisted Pulse-Plasma Deposition
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Alexander Lukin

    Western-Caucasus Research Center

  • Presentation Abstract

    The efforts of our research team is connected with ion-plasma synthesis of the unique carbyne-based functional nanomaterials with desired properties. The unique properties of the hybridized nanomaterials are provided through the plasma functionalization and embedding atoms of various chemical elements into the structure of carbyne nano-films. Chains of double or triple-bonded carbon atoms, known as carbyne, are stronger and stiffer than any known material. The new form of carbon is stronger than graphene and diamond. Carbyne is something of a mystery. Astronomers believe they have detected its signature in interstellar space but chemists have been bickering for decades over whether they had ever created this stuff on Earth. Carbyne has other interesting properties too. Its flexibility is somewhere between that of a typical polymer and double-stranded DNA. And when twisted, it can either rotate freely or become torsionally stiff depending on the chemical group attached to its end. Carbon-based nano-materials are critical for sensing applications, as they have unique physical and electronic properties which facilitate the detection of substances in solutions, gaseous compounds and pollutants through their conductive properties and resonance-frequency transmission capacities. Suggested new nano-engineering strategy opens potential for improved advanced energy storage. For instance, assembling two-dimensionally ordered linear-chain carbon nano-matrix with calcium clusters, which suck up hydrogen molecules, creates a high-density, reversible hydrogen storage device. In case of using the electrokinetic phenomena and acoustic holograms we can improve the energy storage capability of the obtained carbon-based nano-matrices, that can be used in the supercapacitors for Directed Energy applications. Fundamental improvement of the technology for growing carbon-based nano-matrices is connected with application of the data-driven carbon nanostructures genome approach for programming of the spatially controlled growth, structural self-organizing and cluster-assembling of the carbyne-based nano-matrix during ion-assisted pulse-plasma deposition.

5:45 pm - 6:15 pm

Electromagnetic metamaterials technology
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Miguel Navarro-Cía

    University of Birmingham

  • Presentation Abstract

    Modern technology show fantastic achievements in device integration, miniaturization and power efficiency. However, we are reaching the limits imposed by nature. In order to take a major leap forward, we need to develop new materials such as metamaterials to realise game changing technologies. The development of metamaterials (e.g. synthesised composite material whose electromagnetic, optical, acoustic, etc. properties are designed not only by varying chemical composition, but also by the unit cell’s shape, internal structure, position, orientation, etc.) continues to redefine the boundaries of material science and they have widen the material design opportunities. In this seminar, I will primarily summarise our activity in metamaterials research for antennas and detectors and our efforts for tunability and reconfigurability.

6:15 pm - 6:25 pm

BREAK

6:25 pm- 6:55 pm

Squeezing light inside memory devices for improved performances
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Giuliana Di Martino

    University of Cambridge

  • Presentation Abstract

    I will discuss how, simply with the aid of visible light, we see morphological changes happening inside functioning memory devices allowing their breakdown mechanisms to be probed. I will focus on a specific class of devices, known as memristors, which are low-power, nanosecond response devices that are used in a range of memory-centric technologies. The ability to understand how morphological changes characterise their function is vital in their development, but looking deep inside a 3D nanoscale active device has proved extremely tough with traditional investigation techniques. To solve this, we have discovered how to reliably construct nm-sized cavities and routinely confine light within these active devices. We are now able to detect the motion of just few oxygen vacancies and therefore identify the breaking mechanisms upon cycling. This opens up new routes for device optimization and enables large-scale technology applications.
    [1] Di Martino et al.; Nature Electronics, 3(11):687-693 (2020); Real-Time In-Situ Optical Tracking of Oxygen Vacancy Migration in Memristors
    [2] Di Martino et al.; Nanophotonics (2019); 8, 1579; Optically Accesible Memristive Devices
    [3] Di Martino et al.; Small (2016) 12, 1334; Nanoscale Plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy in Memristive Switches

6:55 pm- 7:25 pm

Sub-wavelength Bio-sensing in the Terahertz Domain with Metamaterials
  • Speaker:
  • Dr. Stephen Hanham

    University of Birmingham

  • Presentation Abstract

    The terahertz frequency range (100 GHz to 3 THz) is an emerging area for the electromagnetic spectrum for many chemical, biological and security sensing applications. One area where terahertz sensing is predicted to have a significant impact is in biology, particularly biological liquids. However, the relatively long wavelength of terahertz radiation poses a barrier towards the characterisation of small quantities of biological liquids and new techniques are required to improve the sensitivity and reduce the required sample size. In this talk, I will describe two alternate approaches we have taken recently which exploit the ability of metamaterials to achieve sub-wavelength field confinement and strong field enhancements to improve sensing sensitivity. The first uses spoof surface plasmon polaritons on engineered metal surfaces to provide enhanced THz-matter interaction times and strong interrogating evanescent fields. In the second approach, we demonstrate the integration of terahertz photonic crystal resonators (PCRs) with microfluidics to realise a liquid sensing platform that exploits the PCR’s high quality-factor resonance to enhance the liquid-terahertz interaction. These results represent a step towards a lab-on-a-chip device for the analysis of nano-litre volumes of biological, toxic, explosive, and other liquid types at terahertz frequencies.

7:25 pm - 7:55 pm

Optical Metamaterials for Tailoring and Enhancing Light-Matter Interactions
  • Speaker:
  • Prof. Pai-Yen Chen

    University of Illinois

  • Presentation Abstract

    Optical metamaterials and metasurfaces offer unprecedented opportunities to tailor and enhance the interaction of waves with materials. In this talk, I will discuss our recent progress and research in these research areas, showing how tailored nanostructures (meta-atoms) and suitable arrangements of them into metamaterials may open exciting venues to manipulate and control light at nanoscale dimensions.  I will discuss our most recent theoretical and experimental findings, including plasmonic devices to control, localize and emit light, giant nonlinearities and quantum optical effects in properly tailored nanoantennas and metasurfaces, and new avenues for harvesting and conversion of emissive energy using metamaterials. Physical insights into these exotic phenomena, new devices based on these concepts, and their impact on technology will be discussed during the talk. 

7:55 pm - 8:25 pm

Wavefront Control with Acoustic Metamaterials: Concepts and Applications
  • Speaker:
  • Prof. Steven Cummer

    Duke University

  • Presentation Abstract

    Acoustic metamaterials use structure, rather than the intrinsic properties of materials, to manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are challenging or impossible with conventional materials. One of the main paradigms behind acoustic metamaterial design is wavefront control, in which known incident wavefronts are to be converted into desired reflected or transmitted wavefronts. In this way, incident acoustic energy can be arbitrarily steered, split, focused, or even given orbital angular momentum. Such wave manipulation can often be accomplished in a relatively thin acoustic metamaterial structure (also called a metasurface), making physical realization simpler. This presentation will describe some of our group’s recent research in the area of acoustic wavefront control. This will include a short summary of our metasurface research using phase-control elements and diffraction, followed by more recent work on so-called perfect metasurfaces, in which acoustic structures are designed to control the local surface impedance and thereby create more efficient transmission and reflection. The last part will describe our applications of these concepts to create ultrasonic acoustic fields in water to control fluid force, trapping, and streaming at small spatial scales.

8:25 - 8:55 pm

Wave Control for Wireless Communications: From Time-Reversal Processing to Reconfigurable Intelligent Metasurfaces
  • Speaker:
  • Prof. Mathias Fink

    Langevin Institute

  • Presentation Abstract

    In this talk, I will show how the works performed at Langevin Institute have led to the seminal concept behind large reconfigurable intelligent surfaces (RIS) that is currently a topic of great interest in the wireless communication community and that is proposed as a new paradigm for the sixth generation (6G) of communication networks. Starting with the first demonstrations of ultrasonic “time-reversal mirrors” focusing in complex media in the early nineties, I will underline how these ideas were first used for underwater acoustic communications and were transposed later, for electromagnetic waves, into the concept of massive MIMO for the 5G communication networks to optimize channel diversity. Compared to these techniques that need multiple antenna array, I will explain how we proposed, 9 years ago, another approach using tunable metasurfaces to obtain with a limited number of transmitters the best communication performance. The main idea is to replace the numerous transmitting antennas, used in massive MIMO, by a smart modification of the wireless environment by physically shaping the propagation medium to achieve optimal focusing and channel diversity. Smart mirrors placed inside any wireless environment can tune the medium complexity to obtain the best communication performance. I will show how the optimization of these metasurfaces results from the generalization of the “time reversal mirror” concept to the one of the product of different time-reversal mirrors associated with each transmitters and receivers.

8:55 pm - 9:00 pm

Closing Day 2
  • SPEAKERS:
  • Dr Vincenzo Giannini

    Technology Innovation Institute